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20110701
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
of rupert murdoch's top deputies. elizabeth palmer is in london with more. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. the police investigation is getting very serious now. one of the main lines of inquiry is going to determine or try and determine whether senior officers of murdoch's company knew of or were involved in unethical or especially illegal activity. mobbed by reporters in london, rupert murdoch plowed through, all smiles, to have dinners with his embattled ceo rebekah brooks. she'll be questioned by police later this week. there is a scramble inside murdoch's media empire to control toxic fallout from the "news of the world" hacking scandal which could start waves in the u.s. >> there are waves of could it have happened here? there are locks of reporters at any given time on the ground in the u.s., many stories, many of its celebrity stories are datelined here. >> reporter: the scandal broke last week with the case of milly dowler, a teenager murdered in 2002. her parents and thousands of others discovered that personal voice messages had been hacked by "news of the world" journal
. and today, the media mogul who owns the paper, rupert murdoch, swooped in, trying to limit the damage. abc's jeffrey kofman is in london tonight. >> reporter: rupert murdoch rushed to london today to rescue the $33 billion media empire he has spent his life building. as he arrived, he was reading the last issue of "the news of the world." the paper that began his overseas expansion 42 years ago. the best-selling tabloid was on the newsstands here for the last time. >> i think if you've done wrong, you should face the consequences. >> reporter: the paper brought down by the criminal excesses of its reporters in search of sensational stories. but in the eyes of many, it was brought down by management that still refuses to acknowledge its own role. that is rebekah brooks, who dined with murdoch tonight. she was editor while many of the crimes were committed. 270 people lost their jobs this weekend. she stayed. but murdococmay lose a huge business deal. his plan to take 100% control of britain's b-sky-b satellite network. this scandal has highlighted what many in britain consider a near monopo
the same to some of rupert murdoch's top deputies. in left knee done this morning with more is elizabeth palmer. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. one of the main lines of inquiry is going to try to determine whether senior officers of murd murdoch's company knew of or were involved in unethical or especially illegal activity. mobbed by reporters in london, rupert murdoch battled through reporters to have lunch with rebecca brooks. there is a scramble inside the media empire to control toxic fallout from "the news of the world" hacking scandal, which could start making waves in the u.s. >> there's also the issue of did it happen here? "the news of the world" has lots and lots of reporters at any given time on the ground in the u.s. many of its stories, particularly many of its celebrity stories are datelined here. >> reporter: the scandal broke last week with the case of millie dauer. her parents and others discovered that personal voice messages had been hack ed by nes of the journalists hunting for stories. in 2007, a secret internal investigation at murdoch's uk company -- the
. the final edition is being prepared right now. the last edition comes out tomorrow. rupert murdoch who owns the paper decided to shut it down after allegations surfaced that its journalists illegally hacked phone messages belonging to murder and terrorist victims. rupert murdoch is expected to arrive in london tomorrow to deal with this crisis. >>> coming up, we will have a live report from london on the fallout from the scandal and what it could mean for the rest of rupert murdoch's vast media empire. >>> and the media everywhere have joined the chase after these two, the royal couple now on their whirlwind itinerary in southern california. but the duke and duchess of cambridge also have serious work ahead of them. ♪ ♪ look at that car, well, it goes fast ♪ ♪ givin' my dad a heart attack ♪ [ friend ] that is so awesome. ♪ i love my car [ engine revving ] [ male announcer ] that first chevy, yea, it gets under your skin. ♪ control your budget? yes. our "name your price" tool shows you a range of options. you pick a price that works for you. perfect. only one thing could make t
and not going away. >> you might wonder how it's going to affect murdoch's acquisition of sky news. >> yeah, and that was something that they were resisting all along, and now they have embraced it and it's effectively giving them 24 weeks of breathing space while that is looked into by the competition commission, and i guess they're hoping the hysteria around the story calms down a bit and allows them to get that deal through. it's looking less and less likely, it must be said, that that deal would be approved now. and there are all sorts of strands to the stories. one newspaper here says the queen's personal details were sold by a corrupt police officers that were charged with protecting her to a journalists from "the news of the world." if this is true, it's difficult to imagine a more serious breach of security for the royal family. not only those phone numbers and those around her that were handed over, but supposedly her eye -- itenary. >> he was pictured yesterday with his embattled chief executive, rebecca brooks, having a meal in an exclusive area of london. no comment, really. he
, "the news of the world" folds. but the hacking scandal tainting rupert murdoch's media empire keep exploding. two more murdoch newspapers now accused of trying to tap into the personal information of a former british prime minister. and pakistan's reaction to news that the united states government is cutting millions of dollars in military aid. i'll talk to the country's ambassador to the united states about the growing tension and the impact on the war on terror. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." the federal debt is soaring high or above the limit almost by the second. and president obama is vowing to hold daily negotiations to raise the ceiling if that's what it takes. another round of talks broke up just a little while ago without repeat any break through. with 22 days left the president says he won't accept the stop gap plan to prevent america from defaulting on its debts. he used a news conference this morning to challenge both parties and to lay down some markers. >> i will not sign a 30-day or a 60-day or a 90-day extension. that's just not an acceptable appr
in the capital of cirri, damascus. rupert murdoch is expected to arrive in london shortly to take challenge of the phone hacking crisis. it has led to the closure of this sunday's edition. the editor of the newspaper until 2007 has been released on bail after being interviewed about allegations of corruption. >> what happened? have written better if he were -- and the probably been better if he were still at the helm. concern -- conspiracy and corruption. finding himself in the political doc, the prime minister decided to plead guilty for failing to take seriously the epidemic of phone hacking. >> we turned a blind eye to the need to sort this issue, to get on top of bad practices, to change the way newspapers are related. we have not correct this issue. >> their work, though, mitigating circumstances. he, like other politicians, wanted the papers to help him win. >> a relationship that came too close, became too cozy. do we spend enough time asking questions about how these organizations are regulated, and malpractice and the rest of it? no, we did not. >> david cameron was warned before t
titan rupert murdoch. it was a big day for sales this morning as they said thanks and good-bye. >> yeah. there was a lot of interest. of course, some organizations are actually calling for a boycott today to show their fury at what happened. last week, let's remember, this was the biggest selling pap ner britain with an unrivaled reputation for journalistic scoop spots. the press itself fell silent this morning for the final time. and this is the last edition. so it has been a very long week on what we call fleet street here in britain. it's also been a very uncomfortable week for media boss rupert murdoch. >> reporter: for millions in britain, sunday morning involves a walk to the news agent to pick up "news of the world." a ritual their parents, grandparents, even great grandparents would recognize. but with thank you and good-bye, today is their last chance. the 168-year-old tabloid that thrived on scandal and exposie ing hypocrisy has itself been destroyed by a scandal of its own. the paper is being investigated for paying police for information and allegation of voice mail hacking.
dad did, my grandfather did and it's what we do today. from the embattled press baron rupert murdoch to the polo playing prince william and his bride stories with the british connection have been very much in the news this past week. ben tracy will have more on the royal tour of california. but first elizabeth palmer in london with the latest on the end of the world, at least for the world's newspaper, that is. >> reporter: the last edition of the news of the world was a proud farewell that recalled 168 years of sunday scoops. rupert murdoch bought the paper in 1969 and used its profits to build his vast media empire that now includes fox news, the wall street journal, and the new york post. but this week this scrappy tabloid was engulfed by scandal. though it remained one of the best-selling newspapers in the english speaking world its name is disgraced and the fallout has damaged politicians, the police and the formidable mr. murdoch. the scandal exploded with a teenager murdered in 2002. on monday in london, a private investigator working for the news of the world was accused of h
this sunday and the profits will go to good causes according to james murdoch who runs the international side of the media group. the tabloid news of the world at one time had been the best selling english language paper in the world, until very recently the top sunday paper in britain. >> i feel regret. clearly practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in, that i believe in and that this company believes in which. >> reporter: at issue, a long running phone hacking scandal in which the victims had been largely celebrities but there was outrage when allegations emerged the paper hacked the phones of a school girl who had been abducted and was ultimately killed and victims of the terror attacks on london transport which happened six years ago today. prime minister david cameron who is former press secretary caught in the hacking scandal called for an inquiry. >> what this government is doing is making sure that the fact the public and i feel so appalled by what has happened, murder victims
of the world's largest and oldest newspapers owned by media mogul rupert murdoch. new signs that it could have spread all of the way to the u.s. jeffrey kofman has more for us. >> good morning to you, robin. here's the final issue of the news of the world. this scandal did not die with the death of the newspaper. all eyes on a huge american company, news corporation. rupert murdoch rushed to london to try to contain the damage. while he arrived he was reading the last news of the world. his empire now under siege. in its pursuit of sensational stories the news of the world crossed the line into criminal activity. the public has lost faith. >> i think it does need to go for what it's done. >> reporter: rebeck kari brooks, she was editor a decade ago. she gets to keep her job and so does james murdoch who runs the british arm of the company. he, too, said it wasn't his fault. >> i acted on the advice of executives and lawyers with a completion investigation. >> reporter: the ultimate boss james could face prosecution under u.s. and british business law. if convicted, jail time. >> while brooks a
everyone. >>> rupert murdoch is in damage control mode over the growing phone hacking scandal at one of his british newspapers. murdoch arrives in london today. reporters for the 168-year-old "news of the world" are accused of hacking cell phones of crime victim, celebrities and politicians. three people have been arrested and the weekly tabloid is ceasing publication tomorrow. >>> the obama administration is sending a strong signal to anti-government protesters in searia. the u.s. ambassador to syria met demonstrators on the streets of the besieged city friday. hundreds of thousands greeted him with roses and olive branches. >>> citizens of the world's newest nation were literally dancing in the streets. south sudan is celebrating its independence from sudan after decades of civil war. south sudan is expected next week to become the 193rd country recognized by the united nations. >>> astronauts aboard "atlantis" will spend most of their first full day looking for damage. the liftoff of the shuttle went off almost without a hitch. a crowd of almost a million turned out to watch that launch.
in this tough economy. >>> damage control, rupert murdoch, the observer of the "wall street journal" and fox news travels to london today to take control of the hacking scandal surrounding his london tabloid that is sending shock waves through the british government. we'll talk to the lawyer of a family of this little girl who touched off this growing firestorm. >>> and royal invasion. after conquering canada, prince william and his wife catherine hit l.a., where they could outshine some of hollywood's brightest stars. "early" this saturday morning, july 9th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a picture perfect day in the big city. i'm russ mitchell. >> i'm rebecca jarvis. from the jobs to the royals and the shuttle launch and to betty ford. >> a courageous first lady who battled addiction to pain killers and addiction to alcohol and defeating breast cancer. she died in palm springs, california, she was 93 years old. scott pelley takes a look back at her remarkable life. >> reporter: relatively unknown until her husband became president, betty ford became one of the most popular a
murdoch. new signs that it could have spread all of the way to the u.s. jeffrey kofman has more for us. good morning, jeffrey. >> reporter: good morning to you, robin. here's the final issue of "the news of the world." this scandal did not die with the death of the newspaper. all eyes on a huge american company, news corporation. rupert murdoch rushed to london to try to contain the damage. while he arrived he was reading the last news of the world. the paper that helped establish what is now a $33 billion global empire. the paper he decided he had to kill. his empire now under siege because in its pursuit of sensational stories, "the news of the world" crossed the line into criminal activity. the public has lost faith. >> i think it does need to go for what it's done. >> reporter: rebekah brooks was editor a decade ago when many of the alleged crimes were committed. she gets to keep her job. and so does james murdoch who runs the british arm of the company. he, too, said it wasn't his fault. >> i acted on the advice of executives and lawyers with a completion in
to close down operations. yet today, owner rupert murdoch expressed "total support for rebekah brooks," the embattled executive who formerly edited the paper. south sudan became the newest nation trying to become the u.n.'s 193rd member following civil wars that left an estimated 1.5 million dead. holding most of the nation's oil reserve, continued tensions in the former sudan. dignitaries at the ceremonies were colin powell and u.n. envoy susan rice. a federal judge in new york city heard arguments in a lawsuit that challenges search procedures at the u.s. border. at issue the privacy of personal electronic devices and the plaintiff is an american citizen who says he has done nothing wrong. michelle miller has more. >> i've crossed the border dozens of times. >> pascal was on a train from montreal to new york last year when his travel history raised concerns at the u.s. border. >> i lived in jordan. i've traveled to lebanon. and i've also been to yemen. >> border agents searched his belongings, seized his laptop and ordered him to log on. >> next thing i know, my laptop is being peru
to damage more of the media empire, rupert murdoch will fly into the uk. his own son, james murdock, could face prosecution. yesterday, two top employees were arrested, an editor who once served as the prime minister's communication director and a reporter who served prison time in 2007 when victims included celebrities and members of the royal family. the claim, that people's privacy was invaded. their cell phone voice mails listened to, described as phone hacking. britain's prime minister vowing, no stone will be left unturned. >> that these people could have had their phones hacked into in order to generate stories for a newspaper is simply disgusting. >> among the 4,000 potential phone hacking victims whose names or numbers have now been turned over to the police, families tony phillipson just found out that his son, james, who died in afghanistan in 2006 may have had not only his cell phone tapped into by the news of the world, but also his e-mail. >> they hacked into a dead soldier. this is despicable. what else can you say? what on earth do they think they're going to find. >> in th
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)